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How to Create Stunning Visual Stories with Flutter Charts?

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Kesar Bhimani

Engineering
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Nidhi Sorathiya

Engineering
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August 18, 2023
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August 18, 2023
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In the world of mobile app development, Flutter has emerged as a game-changer. Flutter is an open-source UI toolkit from Google that allows developers to build natively compiled applications for mobile, web, and desktop from a single codebase. One of the many features that make Flutter stand out is its ability to create beautiful and interactive charts.

What is Flutter?

Flutter is a cross-platform development framework that uses the Dart programming language. It provides a rich set of widgets and tools for creating visually appealing, highly interactive applications. Flutter apps are known for their high performance and seamless user experience, which is comparable to that of native apps.

Importance of Data Visualization

Data visualization is a crucial aspect of modern applications. It involves the representation of data in a graphical or pictorial format. By visualizing data, we can understand complex data sets better, uncover insights, and make more informed decisions.

In the context of Flutter apps, data visualization often involves the use of charts. Charts are an effective way to represent data as they can quickly and easily convey trends and patterns. Whether it's a line chart, bar chart, pie chart, or radar chart, each type serves a specific purpose and can greatly enhance the end-user experience.

Introduction to Flutter Charts

Flutter charts are data visualization widgets that come with the Flutter package. They are a part of the charting library for Flutter and include a variety of chart types. From line charts and bar charts to pie charts and scatter charts, the Flutter charts library supports a wide range of chart types.

Whether you need to create charts with live data or static data, Flutter charts can handle it all. The chart data can include anything from simple data points to complex data sets. The chart widget in Flutter is completely customizable, allowing you to change everything from the chart type to the appearance of data points.

Getting Started with Flutter Charts

Creating charts in Flutter is a straightforward process. However, before we dive into creating charts, we need to set up our development environment and create a new Flutter project.

Setting Up the Development Environment

First, we need to ensure that we have Flutter and Dart installed on our system. If you haven't installed Flutter yet, you can do so by following the instructions on the official Flutter docs. Once Flutter is installed, Dart will also be installed as it comes with the Flutter SDK.

Next, we need an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to write our code. You can use any IDE that supports Flutter and Dart. Some popular choices include VS Code, Android Studio, and IntelliJ IDEA. After installing your preferred IDE, make sure to install the Flutter and Dart plugins.

Creating a New Flutter Project

After setting up the development environment, we can create a new Flutter project. Open your terminal or command prompt and run the following command:

This command creates a new Flutter project called 'flutter_charts'. You can replace 'flutter_charts' with the name of your choice.

Navigate into the project directory with the command cd flutter_charts. Now, open the project in your preferred IDE.

Adding fl_chart Dependencies

To use fl_chart in our project, we need to add the fl_chart package to our project. Open the pubspec.yaml file and add the fl_chart dependency under dependencies:

After adding the dependency, run the flutter pub get command in the terminal to fetch the package. This command updates the project's dependencies and installs the fl_chart package.

Understanding the Basics of fl_chart

Before we start creating charts, it's essential to understand the basics of fl_chart. This section will provide an overview of the fl_chart library and the basic components of a chart.

fl_chart Library Overview

The fl_chart library is a powerful, yet flexible library for creating a wide range of charts in Flutter. It includes a variety of chart types, including line charts, bar charts, pie charts, and scatter charts. The library is highly customizable, allowing you to change everything from the chart type to the appearance of data points.

One of the key features of the fl_chart library is its support for interactive charts. This means you can create charts that respond to user interactions, such as touch events. This feature can provide a more engaging user experience and can be particularly useful for apps that need to display interactive data visualizations.

Basic Components of a Chart

A chart in fl_chart consists of several components:

  • Chart Data: The data that the chart will display. This could be a simple list of numbers, or a more complex data structure, depending on the type of chart.
  • Chart Type: The type of chart to display. The fl_chart library supports a wide range of chart types, including line charts, bar charts, pie charts, and scatter charts.
  • Data Points: The individual points of data on the chart. In a line chart, for example, each data point represents a point on the line.
  • Axes: The x and y-axes of the chart. The axes provide a reference frame for the data points and can be customized to suit your needs.
  • Grid: The grid lines on the chart. These lines can help users better understand the data by providing a reference frame.
  • Touch Response: The way the chart responds to touch events. You can customize the touch response to provide different types of interactivity, such as highlighting a data point when it's touched.

Types of Charts in fl_chart

The fl_chart library supports a wide range of chart types. Each chart type is suitable for a specific kind of data and provides a different way to visualize the data.

  • Line Charts: Line charts are used to display data points connected by straight lines. They are commonly used to show trends over time.
  • Bar Charts: Bar charts use rectangular bars to represent data. The length of each bar corresponds to the value it represents. Bar charts are useful for comparing quantities of different categories.
  • Pie Charts: Pie charts represent data in the form of slices of a pie. Each slice corresponds to a category of the data, and the size of the slice is proportional to the quantity it represents.
  • Scatter Charts: Scatter charts use dots to represent data points on a two-dimensional plane. They are useful for showing the relationship between two variables.
  • Radar chart: A Radar Chart, also known as a Spider Chart or a Star Chart, is a way of comparing multiple quantitative variables. This makes them useful for seeing which variables have similar values or if there are any outliers amongst each variable.

Creating Your First Flutter Chart

Now that we have a basic understanding of fl_chart, let's create our first chart. For this example, we will create a simple line chart.

Defining the Data

First, we need to define the data for our chart. In this example, we will use a simple list of data points. Each data point will consist of a time and a value.

In this code snippet, we create a list of FlSpot objects representing our chart data. Each FlSpot object represents a point on the chart, with the x-coordinate and y-coordinate as parameters.

Creating a Simple Line Chart

Next, we will create a line chart using the fl_chart package. We will use the LineChart widget and pass our data to it.

In this code snippet, we first create a LineChart widget. Inside the LineChart widget, we use the LineChartData constructor to define the data and appearance of the chart. The LineChartData constructor takes several parameters, including gridData, titlesData, borderData, and lineBarsData.

Adding Axis to the Chart

To make our chart more readable, we can add axis to it. The x-axis will represent time, and the y-axis will represent the value.

In this code snippet, we add a FlTitlesData to the LineChartData constructor, which represents the titles of the axes. We customize the appearance of the axis using the SideTitles widget.

Rendering the Chart

Finally, we need to render our chart. We can do this by adding the LineChart widget to our app's widget tree.

In this code snippet, we first define a MyApp widget, which is the root widget of our app. Inside the MyApp widget, we create a MaterialApp widget. The MaterialApp widget contains a Scaffold widget, which provides a basic structure for our app, including an AppBar and a Body.

In the body of the Scaffold, we add a Padding widget to provide some padding around our chart. Inside the Padding widget, we add our LineChart widget.

Finally, we call the runApp function in the main function and pass our MyApp widget to it. This function is the entry point of our app and starts the app.

Customizing Your fl_chart

One of the key features of the fl_chart library is its high level of customizability. You can customize almost every aspect of your chart, from the colors and shapes of the data points to the appearance of the axes and gridlines. In this section, we will explore how to customize your fl_chart.

Modifying Chart Colors

You can easily change the colors of your chart in fl_chart. For example, you can change the color of the line in a line chart by setting the colors property of the LineChartBarData:

In this code snippet, we set the colors property to a list containing Colors.red, which changes the color of the line to red.

Customizing the Axis

You can customize the axes of your chart to suit your needs. For example, you can change the appearance of the titles on the axes by setting the titlesData property of the LineChartData:

In this code snippet, we set the titlesData property to a FlTitlesData object, which allows us to customize the titles on the axes. We set the getTextStyles function to return a TextStyle object that changes the color, font weight, and font size of the titles. We also set the getTitles function to return custom titles for the axes.

With these customizations, you can create a chart that fits perfectly with your app's design and provides a great user experience. Remember, the key to a good chart is not just the data it displays, but also how it displays the data. With fl_chart, you have a wide range of options to customize your charts and make them as simple or as complex as you need.

Advanced fl_chart Features

While we've covered the basics of creating and customizing charts with fl_chart, there's still much more that the library has to offer. In this section, we'll delve into some of the more advanced features of fl_chart.

Interactive Features

One of the standout features of fl_chart is its support for interactivity. This means that you can create charts that respond to user interactions, such as touch events. This can provide a more engaging user experience and can be particularly useful for apps that need to display interactive data visualizations.

Animation in Charts

fl_chart also supports animations. You can animate the transitions between different states of your chart, which can make your charts more visually appealing and easier to understand.

Multi-Series Charts

fl_chart supports multi-series charts. This means that you can display multiple series of data on the same chart. Each series can be represented by a different color or shape, making it easy to distinguish between different series.

Custom Shapes and Colors

With fl_chart, you have complete control over the appearance of your charts. You can customize the shapes and colors of your data points, the appearance of the axes and gridlines, and much more.

Tooltips and Labels

fl_chart provides support for tooltips and labels. You can display additional information about a data point when the user hovers over it or clicks on it. This can be particularly useful for providing context and additional details about the data.

Zooming and Panning

fl_chart supports zooming and panning. This means that users can zoom in and out of the chart and pan around to explore the data in more detail.

Exploring Different Types of Charts

The fl_chart library supports a wide range of chart types, each suitable for visualizing different kinds of data. Let's explore some of the most commonly used chart types and how to create them using fl_chart.

Bar Charts

Bar charts are excellent for comparing quantities of different categories. Each bar in the chart represents a category, and the length of the bar corresponds to its quantity.

Here's an example of how to create a bar chart using fl_chart:

Pie Charts

Pie charts represent data in the form of slices of a pie. Each slice corresponds to a category of the data, and the size of the slice is proportional to the quantity it represents.

Here's an example of how to create a pie chart using fl_chart:

Scatter Charts

Scatter charts use dots to represent data points on a two-dimensional plane. They are useful for showing the relationship between two variables.

Here's an example of how to create a scatter plot using fl_chart:

Radar Charts

Radar charts, also known as spider charts or star charts, are a way of comparing multiple quantitative variables. This makes them useful for seeing which variables have similar values or if there are any outliers amongst each variable. Radar Charts are also useful when visualizing performance analysis or survey data.

Here's an example of how to create a radar chart using fl_chart:

The RadarChart widget takes a RadarChartData object that defines the data and appearance of the chart. You can control the animation duration and curve using optional swapAnimationDuration and swapAnimationCurve properties, respectively.

Each RadarDataSet contains a list of RadarEntries that is shown in the RadarChart. You can fill the DataSet with a specified color using fillColor, paint the DataSet border with a specified color using borderColor, and define the radius of each RadarEntries using entryRadius.

These are just a few examples of the many types of charts you can create with fl_chart. With its high level of customizability and wide range of supported chart types, fl_chart offers a powerful tool for data visualization in Flutter

Handling Real-Time Data with fl_chart

One of the standout features of fl_chart is its ability to handle real-time data. This means you can create charts that update dynamically as new data comes in. This feature is particularly useful for apps that need to display live data, such as stock trading apps or apps that monitor sensor data.

Updating Charts with Real-Time Data

To update a chart with real-time data, you need to update the data set that the chart is using and then redraw the chart. This can be done by changing the state of the widget that contains the chart.

Here's an example of how you might update a line chart with real-time data:

In this code snippet, we create a StatefulWidget that contains a line chart. In the initState method, we start a stream of data that emits a new value every second. Each time a new value is emitted, we add a new FlSpot to the data list and call setState to update the chart.

Animating Changes in Real-Time Data

fl_chart also supports animations, which can be used to smoothly transition between different states of the chart. This can be particularly useful when displaying real-time data, as it allows the chart to smoothly update as new data comes in.

To animate changes in real-time data, you can use the extraLinesData property of the LineChartData. This property allows you to add extra lines to the chart that can be animated. You can update these lines with new data and animate the changes using the tween property of the ExtraLineData.

Best Practices for fl_chart

While fl_chart is a powerful tool for creating charts in Flutter, it's essential to follow best practices to ensure that your charts are effective, efficient, and user-friendly. Here are some best practices to keep in mind when using fl_chart.

Ensuring Readability and Clarity

The primary purpose of a chart is to communicate information. Therefore, it's crucial to ensure that your charts are easy to read and understand. Here are a few ways to ensure readability and clarity:

  • Use appropriate chart types: Different chart types are suitable for different kinds of data. Make sure to choose the chart type that best represents your data.
  • Use clear labels: Labels help users understand what the data points and axes represent. Make sure your labels are clear and concise.
  • Use contrasting colors: Colors can help differentiate between different data points or series. Make sure to use colors that contrast well with each other and with the background.

Optimizing Performance

Charts can be computationally intensive, especially when dealing with large amounts of data or complex visualizations. Here are a few ways to optimize the performance of your charts:

  • Limit the number of data points: While fl_chart can handle large amounts of data, displaying too many data points can slow down your app and make the chart difficult to read. If possible, try to limit the number of data points you display at once.
  • Use animations sparingly: While animations can make your charts more engaging, they can also slow down your app. Use animations sparingly, and consider providing an option to turn them off.
  • Update charts efficiently: When updating a chart with new data, try to do so in the most efficient way possible. For example, instead of recreating the entire chart, you can update only the data that has changed.

Providing Interactivity

Interactivity can make your charts more engaging and useful. fl_chart provides several options for adding interactivity to your charts, such as touch responses and tooltips. Here are a few ways to provide interactivity:

  • Use touch responses: Touch responses can provide feedback to the user and allow them to interact with the data. For example, you could highlight a data point when it's touched or show a tooltip with more information.
  • Use tooltips: Tooltips can provide additional information about a data point or series. They can be particularly useful for providing context or detailed information that wouldn't fit on the chart itself.
  • Provide options to customize the chart: Providing options for the user to customize the chart can make it more useful and engaging. For example, you could allow the user to choose which data series to display, change the chart type, or adjust the time range.

By following these best practices, you can create charts that are not only visually appealing but also effective in communicating information and providing a great user experience.

Build Your Next App With Flutter Chart!

Data visualization is a crucial aspect of modern applications, and Flutter, with its powerful charting library, fl_chart, provides a comprehensive solution for creating interactive and visually appealing charts. From setting up your development environment to creating and customizing various types of charts, this guide has walked you through the entire process of using fl_chart in Flutter.

We've explored the basics of creating charts, including line charts, bar charts, pie charts, and scatter plots. We've also delved into more advanced features like handling real-time data, adding animations, and providing interactivity. Moreover, we've discussed best practices to ensure your charts are readable, efficient, and user-friendly.

Remember, the key to a good chart is not just the data it displays, but also how it displays the data. With fl_chart, you have a wide range of options to customize your charts and make them as simple or as complex as you need. Whether you're building a financial app that needs to display stock prices in real-time, a fitness app that tracks user progress over time, or a business app that visualizes complex datasets, fl_chart offers a powerful and flexible solution for data visualization in Flutter.

Frequently asked questions

How do you make a chart on Flutter?

You can create a chart in Flutter using various packages, one of which is the fl_chart package. Here's a basic example of creating a line chart using fl_chart:

What are the different types of charts in Flutter?

The fl_chart package supports a variety of chart types, including line charts, bar charts, pie charts, scatter plots, and area charts. Each chart type is suitable for visualizing different kinds of data.

What is the waterfall chart in Flutter?

As of now, the fl_chart package does not natively support waterfall charts. A waterfall chart is a form of data visualization that illustrates how an initial value is affected by a series of intermediate positive or negative values.

How do you make a pie chart on flutter?

You can create a pie chart in Flutter using the PieChart widget from the fl_chart package. Here's a basic example:

What is the donut pie chart in flutter?

A donut pie chart is a variation of the pie chart, with a hole in the center. You can create a donut pie chart in Flutter using the PieChart widget from the fl_chart package and setting the sectionsSpace property to create a hole in the middle:

How do you use syncfusion charts in Flutter?

Syncfusion provides a separate package for creating charts in Flutter, called syncfusion_flutter_charts. To use it, you need to add it to your dependencies and import it in your file. Then, you can use the SfCartesianChart or SfCircularChart widgets to create charts. Please refer to the official Syncfusion documentation for more detailed instructions and examples.

What is the best chart package for Flutter?

The "best" chart package for Flutter depends on your specific needs and requirements. Some popular options include fl_chart, charts_flutter, and syncfusion_flutter_charts. All of these packages provide a wide range of features and high customizability.

Is Syncfusion charts free?

Syncfusion offers a free community license for their products, including syncfusion_flutter_charts, for individual developers and small businesses. For larger businesses or for more advanced features, they offer paid licenses. Please refer to the official Syncfusion website for more details.

Frequently asked questions

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